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Dutch Oven Chicken and Rice

Dutch Oven Chicken and Rice

YouTube: BBQ Chicken and Rice

This is one of the easiest recipes for roasting chicken that you can make: all it requires is chicken (duh), white rice, and a cast iron dutch oven. When I posted this one to the Cast Iron Cooking group on Facebook, everyone began asking for the recipe. It's one of the most popular dishes on there, along with being one of the simplest.

Pans needed: cast iron dutch oven with lid

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F. In a small bowl or dish, prepare your spice rub.

This recipe works especially well in a large dutch oven. While this dish will fit into a #8 or 5-quart oven, I think the extra space of the #10 size (12-inch) helps to provide more room to properly steam (braise) the chicken, so it isn't cooked to the point where it splits apart.

In your cast iron dutch oven, add 2 cups of rice, 3 and 3/4 cups water, and 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce plus 1/4 cup soy sauce for flavor. Stir a little to evenly distribute the rice in the liquid. It will look as though there is far too much liquid in the pot – the rice will be completely covered in liquid. This is correct: the rice will absorb the liquid as it cooks.

Remove all accessories from the chicken (giblet bag, etc.). Rinse off the chicken, and pat it dry with paper towels. The chicken does not have to be bone-dry; just dry enough so that it doesn't soak your hands when you handle it.

It's not necessary to stuff the chicken, but if you want to do so: cut the potato and onion into halves, and stuff the chicken. If you want to use other chicken stuffing, you can do so. Simply make sure the chicken is only loosely stuffed, not packed tight.

Apply spice rub to entire outside of the chicken. Place the chicken into the pot, on top of the rice. Cover dutch oven with an iron lid. Cook at 375 degrees F for 90 minutes.The chicken will be fall-off-the-bone tender, and the rice will have absorbed the liquid.

(For poultry over 6 pounds, add an additional 15 minutes per pound.)

Here's a hint regarding the rice: when you cook rice in a cast iron pan using this method, a crust of brown, hardened rice will cover the sides and bottom of the pot. This is not burned rice – don't throw this out. Scrape the crust off the bottom of the pot and eat it! This is a tasty treat, and it is very popular in most areas of the world. In Latin America, the hardened rice crust is called pegao, while in Persia it is called tadig.

A YouTube video on the making of this dish: BBQ Chicken and Rice

Referrers: http://pinterest.com/pin/73535406392863244/?source_app=android