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Keith Henson

Difference (from prior minor revision)

Changed: 5c5

< Since then, he has been busted by armed Canadian SWAT officers (who subsequently apologized for the incident), had a constant smear campaign spread about him online accusing him of everythining from terrorism to child molesting (accusations that are all completely false), been trailed by detectives and bounty hunters, and finally arrested in February of 2007, to be extradited to California to face the wrath of the legal system (and the Church of Scientology).

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> Since then, he has been busted by armed Canadian SWAT officers (who subsequently apologized for the incident), had a constant smear campaign spread about him online accusing him of everything from terrorism to child molesting (accusations that are all completely false), been trailed by detectives and bounty hunters, and finally arrested in February of 2007, to be extradited to California to face the wrath of the legal system (and the Church of Scientology).

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< Also of note is the High Weirdness Project's own Web site: [[An Introduction to Scientology]].

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> Also of note is our own Web site: [[An Introduction to Scientology]].


freehenson.da.ru

For an example of the extreme lengths Scientology has gone to attack and destroy its perceived enemies, you can do no better than Keith Henson. This valiant warrior has withered and endured attempts to ruin his life that would drive many people past the breaking point, a long time ago.

Shortly after Scientology's lawsuit was filed against Grady Ward in 1996, alt.religion.scientology participant Keith Henson posted an excerpt from the organization's notorious "secret" scriptures – the NOTs documents – to the newsgroup. He posted NOTs 34: The Sequence for Handling a Physical Condition because he felt that this particular document was, in fact, a violation of a 1971 court order stating that Scientology can no longer claim to be a medical procedure or method for the physical healing of illness, injury, and other ailments. Scientology promptly sued Keith Henson, and after a lengthy legal case in which Henson defended himself (to avoid the mammoth legal costs), the court ruled in favor of Scientology, with a judgment that Scientology proudly claims to be "the largest copyright infringement damages award in history."

Henson was ordered to pay $150,000 in damages for posting a two-page document. Since he could not afford such a payment, he declared bankruptcy and began a campaign of protest against Scientology. The organization retaliated by having Henson brought to trial on "terrorism" charges. After a court case decried by Scientology critics as a "kangaroo court," Henson was convicted of "interfering with a religion." The court sentenced him to 200 days in jail (nine months), but Henson chose instead to move to Canada and apply for political asylum, on the grounds that his human rights were violated by Scientology.

Since then, he has been busted by armed Canadian SWAT officers (who subsequently apologized for the incident), had a constant smear campaign spread about him online accusing him of everything from terrorism to child molesting (accusations that are all completely false), been trailed by detectives and bounty hunters, and finally arrested in February of 2007, to be extradited to California to face the wrath of the legal system (and the Church of Scientology).

Other links of note regarding Keith Henson include:

Provides a decent summary of Henson's saga, with quick updates.

To get an idea of what Scientology has been trying to do to Keith Henson, you should go to their own hate site on the Internet: Religious Freedom Watch. Be sure to check the whole site out and see the outlandish, unbelievable BS they pile up on there. It all falls just a whisker short of libel, of course.

Also of note is our own Web site: An Introduction to Scientology.