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Lodge 10 inch Cast Iron Skillet

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Changed: 3c3

< But, as for the skillet: when I found it on the top shelf of the kitchen cabinet, I'd forgotten all about it. It had been given as a wedding present, a full eight years before, and *never* used. It's an interesting item to give as a wedding gift, and for some reason I can't figure out where the person who gave the pan bought it. Can you? :) Anyway, I was advised to take that pan with me; and a month later I used it to cook a steak on my stovetop, and I cooked that steak entirely wrong by poking and prodding at it continuously for 25 minutes...but I enjoyed myself immensely with it. That was all it took to get me started as a new-found cast iron groupie. The pan had some rust on the bottom from sitting in that dark cabinet for several years, but I was able to take care of that with some steel wool, a mixture of kosher salt and vegetable oil, and about ten minutes of elbow grease. Then from there came the most important part of seasoning the pan: using it. Nearly two years later, the pan is a beautiful black, and I'm still using it at least once per week.

to

> But, as for the skillet: when I found it on the top shelf of the kitchen cabinet, I'd forgotten all about it. It had been given as a wedding present, a full eight years before, and *never* used. It's an interesting item to give as a wedding gift, and for some reason I can't figure out where the person who gave the pan bought it. Can you? :) Anyway, I was advised to take that pan with me; and a month later I used it to [[Searing a Medium Rare Steak|cook a steak on my stovetop]]. I cooked that steak entirely wrong by poking and prodding at it continuously for 25 minutes...but I enjoyed myself immensely with it. That was all it took to get me started as a new-found cast iron groupie. The pan had some rust on the bottom from sitting in that dark cabinet for several years, but I was able to take care of that with some steel wool, a mixture of kosher salt and vegetable oil, and about ten minutes of elbow grease. Then from there came the most important part of seasoning the pan: using it. Nearly two years later, the pan is a beautiful black, and I'm still using it at least once per week.


redneckpan.jpg

All of our cast iron pans have stories behind them, with some being more personal and sentimental. One of my favorites is my very first cast iron pan, which I affectionately call my redneck pan. It's a Lodge 10-inch skillet…and nearly two years ago, it was my only piece of cast iron. What's more, at that time it was sitting in the back of a top shelf of my cabinet, covered with dust and some rust from eight years of neglect. I was bitten by the cast iron bug, hard, when I used this pan for the very first time in December of 2010. It's a long story involving personal drama that I won't get into here, but suffice to say that this proves I've been sucked into the Cult of Cast Iron. :) I'm enjoying this newfound hobby with the obsession of a newbie – you know the kind, the one who has to try everything NOW and just goes way overboard with obsession with his (my) new love. But what the hell – I'm 44 years old, (recently) single, working 50-60 hours a week at a full-time job. I'm enjoying this new vice, and I intend to make the most of it. :)

But, as for the skillet: when I found it on the top shelf of the kitchen cabinet, I'd forgotten all about it. It had been given as a wedding present, a full eight years before, and never used. It's an interesting item to give as a wedding gift, and for some reason I can't figure out where the person who gave the pan bought it. Can you? :) Anyway, I was advised to take that pan with me; and a month later I used it to cook a steak on my stovetop. I cooked that steak entirely wrong by poking and prodding at it continuously for 25 minutes…but I enjoyed myself immensely with it. That was all it took to get me started as a new-found cast iron groupie. The pan had some rust on the bottom from sitting in that dark cabinet for several years, but I was able to take care of that with some steel wool, a mixture of kosher salt and vegetable oil, and about ten minutes of elbow grease. Then from there came the most important part of seasoning the pan: using it. Nearly two years later, the pan is a beautiful black, and I'm still using it at least once per week.

All I know is that it's my first cast iron skillet, and it will be an heirloom. Even if it is my redneck pan.

redneckpan2.jpg