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Wikileaks

Difference (from prior minor revision)

Changed: 10c10

< Wikileaks' home page only added an [[RSS]] feed for regular updates in mid-2009, and the RSS feed is several days behind the actual updates to the site; but there's a way around that. For a look at the latest additions to the site, you can go to their [http://secure.wikileaks.org/wiki/Special:Recentchangeslinked/Category:Analysis_requested Recent Changes] pages to see what's been updated. As a bonus, here's an external RSS feed that regularly checks the Recent Changes page for updates:

to

> Wikileaks' home page only added an [[RSS]] feed for regular updates in mid-2008, and the RSS feed is several days behind the actual updates to the site; but there's a way around that. For a look at the latest additions to the site, you can go to their [http://secure.wikileaks.org/wiki/Special:Recentchangeslinked/Category:Analysis_requested Recent Changes] pages to see what's been updated. As a bonus, here's an external RSS feed that regularly checks the Recent Changes page for updates:


wikileaks.org/

In a manner similar to Cryptome, this site is dedicated to exposing hidden, suppressed, and dangerous information for the world to see. The persons running Wikileaks are all anonymous, and they claim their site is untraceable by anyone to do so, although the domain name wikileaks.org is registered to this site:

 John Shipton c/o Dynadot Privacy
 PO Box 701
 San Mateo, CA  94401
 Phone: +1.6505851961

Since the site opened, it has received threats, warnings, legal orders, and a lot of criticism from the RIAA, the United States military, the Church of Scientology, and various European and Asian governments…and so far, it has withstood them all. Whatever Wikileaks is doing to maintain its independence in the face of these threats has proven to be nearly impossible to break.

Wikileaks uses the same wiki software as Wikipedia, and documents are submitted to Wikileaks in the same way as the online encyclopedia: you create a new article and paste your documents into it, or upload a file. Wikileaks then depends on its users to fact-check the documents and see how accurate they are.

Naturally, the anonymity of Wikileaks is causing some conspiracy theorists to suggest this is actually a front group for the CIA – after all, what better way is there to get their hands on secret documents? However, when Wikileaks released documentation in 2007 revealing the actual manuals for the treatment (or mistreatment) of prisoners at the Guantanamo Bay military prison, this strongly suggested that Wikileaks isn't just a tool of the United States government.

Wikileaks' home page only added an RSS feed for regular updates in mid-2008, and the RSS feed is several days behind the actual updates to the site; but there's a way around that. For a look at the latest additions to the site, you can go to their Recent Changes pages to see what's been updated. As a bonus, here's an external RSS feed that regularly checks the Recent Changes page for updates:

www.feedfire.com/site/rss.cgi?ChanContentId=029583

The RSS feed seems to be a couple of days behind the actual updates to the Recent Changes page, however it seems to be somewhat more recent than Wikileaks' own RSS feed. Even so, it's best to look at the page directly if you want immediate updates.